MND and the mind – who is affected?

Motor Neurone Disease (MND), as the name suggests, is known as a disease of motor neurons, a specific type of neurons that co-ordinate our voluntary movement, leading to loss of the ability to move, speak and breathe. And perhaps because the main focus often falls on the rapidly-progressing physical symptoms and their management, the way MND affects the mind has often be overlooked.

brain networkMost literature on MND states that certain behavioural and cognitive (thinking) problems affect up to 50% people with MND, out of which 15% have a co-occurring diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Adding to this, a recent paper by Dr Christopher Crockford and colleagues, published in the journal Neurology, found that up to 80% of people living with MND will have some form of cognitive or behavioural impairment by the final stage of their disease (or in other words, only 20% will have an intact cognitive and behavioural processing).Read More »

Research on the best practical support for people with cognitive change

We know that some people with MND will be affected by cognitive change and a small proportion of these will develop frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The symptoms of cognitive change include changes in planning and decision making.

To help support people with MND who have these symptoms, and their families and carers, we need to firstly identify or confirm these signs are present and then to find ways to help manage them.

The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (known as ECAS) has been widely adopted as a good method of detecting symptoms of cognitive change. ECAS is a series of tests that are quick to do in the clinic and are specific to MND.Read More »

Screening for Cognitive and Behavioural Change in MND

sharon abrahams and princess royalMND Association-funded researcher Dr Sharon Abrahams (University of Edinburgh) has recently published an article on the Edinburgh Cognitive ALS Screen (ECAS) in the prestigious journal Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration.

It is now recognised that, in up to 50% of people living with MND not only the motor system (walking, talking breathing etc) but also other areas of the brain, particularly those involved in thinking, language and behaviour are affected.

Frontotemporal Dementia

Cognitive and behavioural changes are increasingly common in MND. It is also well known that a small proportion of people living with MND display features of frontotemporal dementia.

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