FaTHoM 2: UK-leading MND clinicians on inherited MND

After its successful premiere in 2017, the University of Oxford organised another meeting of people affected by inherited MND, called ‘Families for the Treatment of Hereditary MND (FaTHoM)’. This turned out to be yet another excellent day where MND clinicians-researchers presented on topics such as genetics of MND, genetic testing and gene therapies. Below you can find out more about what was presented on the day and links to the videos of recorded talks.

Understanding familial MND

Introducing the rationale of the meeting, Prof Martin Turner set the scene by explaining the great difficulty in understanding the disease due to its many possible causes. Being such long cells, many things can go wrong in the motor neurones and in the vast amount of their support cells (such as astrocytes or microglia). But one factor can help us understand the disease better – genes.

Around 5-10% of MND is considered familial. That is, around 1 in 15 people have had someone in their family affected by this disease in the past, making them more likely to develop the disease themselves. Specifically, if we consider the ‘multistep hypothesis’ of MND which assumes that six steps have to happen in our lifetime for the disease to develop, a mistake in a specific gene may reduce the number of the necessary steps to four or even two (read more about the impact of genetic on the multistep hypothesis here).Read More »

Fathoming MND

This article was written by our Senior Clinical Fellow Prof Martin Turner, a Consultant Neurologist at John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford.

“Will it affect my children?” This is one of the questions most commonly asked by people diagnosed with MND. The 20th century answer was a simple “no”, or at least “very unlikely”. With recent scientific advances, however, doctors must give a more complicated answer. At the same time, these advances are cause of excitement about the greater understanding of MND and new hope for treatments for all cases.Read More »

More information for families affected by inherited MND available online

In April this year MND clinician-researchers Professors Martin Turner and Kevin Talbot at the University of Oxford organised an information day about the rare, inherited form of MND called ‘Families for the Treatment of Hereditary MND’ (FATHoM). The day was filmed and podcasts of the talks have recently become available. This article gives an overview of each talk and a link to the video.Read More »