Could MND be treated by HIV drugs?

Recently published results from the open-label Lighthouse trial investigating safety of the drug Triumeq in people with MND revealed the treatment was safe and ready to progress to a larger Phase 3 clinical trial.

The trial was held in Australia and recruited 40 people with MND who all received the active drug; this was because the aim of the trial was to see whether Triumeq, which is already licensed to treat HIV, has a potential as a treatment for MND.

Why HIV drugs?

One of the possible triggers of MND has been suggested to be a group of ‘fossil’ viruses that, over many millions of years of evolution, have left traces of their DNA within our genome. When activated, these ‘retroviruses’ have the ability to merge into our cells, by copying their DNA into our genome, which leads to incorporation of the two DNAs into one. When the affected cell then creates new proteins, partial copies of the virus are produced with it.

Retroviruses have been linked to MND because of findings of a particular retrovirus, called human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K), in the brains and motor neurons of people with the disease. Although some studies failed to confirm this finding, researchers deemed this to be a promising area of therapeutic focus.Read More »