AMBRoSIA and NECTAR – Make your mark on MND

It has been almost a year since we announced that AMBRoSIA (A Multicentre Biomarker Resource Strategy In ALS) had begun to recruit participants (read the Autumn 2017 edition of Thumbprint).

AMBRoSIA is the biggest project that the MND Association has ever funded and recruitment occurs at three sites throughout the UK (Sheffield, headed by Prof Dame Pam Shaw, Oxford, headed by Prof Martin Turner and London, headed by Dr Andrea Malaspina).

The project will collect a number of biological samples, including blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), urine and skin in order to identify biomarkers (markers of biological change) that could be a signature of MND.Read More »

Evaluating a new neck support for people living with MND

We know that neck weakness can be a difficult symptom to manage in people with MND, and that the current offering of neck collars and supports do not always suit everyone. In order to come up with a solution to this, we are funding Dr Chris McDermott from the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) to develop a new type of neck support for people with MND (our reference: 928-794).

5 b (3)Designers, health professionals and engineers, along with people with MND, have developed a new support called the Sheffield Support Snood. The Snood is an adaptable neck collar, which can be modified to offer support where the wearer requires it most.

The Snood was initially tested in 26 people living with MND in 2014. The current stage of the project, called the Heads Up project, will evaluate the Snood in around 150 people. This will contribute towards providing the necessary wider consumer testing of the Snood, which in turn will help when looking for a commercial partner to take on the manufacture of this product.Read More »

Have your say about research priorities

The relative of a close friend of mine is seriously ill with cancer. Supporting my friend and hearing of how their relative is, brings back memories of people close to me that have died. It brings back memories of what happened to them, how it affected me and my family. At the same time I find myself thinking – how would I react to approaching the end of life – would I want to know everything, perhaps I would want to concentrate on living and not think about dying too much?

Either as a relative or someone who has a condition, some of us would be on Google or talking to those around us, looking for answers and reassurance. For some of those questions there aren’t any answers available. Perhaps you can’t or couldn’t find the answers either?

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