Cannabis-based products for medicinal use

In November 2018 the Home Office released a draft Guideline scope for Cannabis-based products for medicinal use in which they announced that specialist doctors (like consultant neurologists) on the Special Register of the General Medical Council will be able to prescribe cannabis-based medicinal products to some patients. Before this, the only cannabis-based medicines licensed for use in the UK were nabiximols (Sativex), used as a treatment for spasticity (where muscles are continuously contracted, causing stiffness or tightness of the muscles, interfering with normal movement and speech), in multiple sclerosis (MS).Read More »

Disease mechanisms: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Several sessions at the Symposium focused on how impairments in key neuronal structures in MND contribute to the development and progression of the disease, and how these could be targeted with therapeutics.

Prof Spires-Jones (C16) opened session 4A with a discussion of the role of synapses in neurodegeneration. Synapse dysfunction and loss is seen in many neurological diseases, including MND, Alzheimer’s disease and Dementia with Lewy bodies. The commonality of synapse loss across these diseases makes it a key therapeutic target, and in addition, most neurological drugs work at the level of synapses, making them a very ‘druggable’ target. Prof Spires-Jones summarised data from her team and others that showed that in MND, synapse degeneration in the frontal cortex is associated with cognitive decline, and damaging TDP-43 protein is found in synapses. Targeting these pathways could be beneficial to prevent or treat MND.

We also heard an interesting talk from Prof Schiavo in session 5A (C29) on the use of axonal transport as a therapeutic target. Deficits in axonal transport are found in many neurological diseases, including MND.  These deficits appear before/at disease onset and are likely to be important in the development of MND. Schiavo talked us through data that showed that the p38 MAPK signalling cascade, which is important for axonal transport, is increased in the SOD1 mouse model of MND, and that long-term treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor partially restores physiological function in MND neurones in vitro and in vivo. Another example showed that inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) (which is overexpressed in MND patients) restores axonal retrograde transport in a SOD1 mouse in vivo, providing further evidence of the possible beneficial effects of targeting key pathways linked to axonal transport. The take-home message was that axonal impairments are reversible and can be modulated by small molecule inhibitors.


Find out more about the topics discussed in Glasgow on our Periodic table of Symposium at www.mndassociation.org/symplive.

Cognition and FTD: Highlights from Glasgow

Written by Rachel Boothman and Kaye Stevens

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Exploration into cognition and frontotemporal dementia with MND/ALS continues to attract attention. At the Symposium in Glasgow 2018, we heard of several studies adding to the growing knowledge bank in this field.

A history of other mental health conditions or psychiatric disorders within the family, or for the individual, indicates a correlation with MND/FTD. There seems to be a link between this increased history and a risk of apathy. Early screening is recommended where these histories exist. This can help prepare families and enable early discussions with the person diagnosed with MND, so they can make decisions that may be important to them in the future (C41) C McHutchison.Read More »

What’s the story with CuATSM

There has recently been a flood of news stories on the outcomes of the Australian Phase 1 clinical trial investigating Copper ATSM (CuATSM) which is a small man-made compound that can selectively deliver copper to cells. The results were first presented at our International Symposium in Glasgow back in December.

MND is a terrible disease and anyone affected by it is looking for good news. We really hope that CuATSM will provide a new treatment for MND that is going to have a positive effect on people’s disease progression.

However, CuATSM is not yet at a stage where a clinician can prescribe it as a treatment. Drug development is a long journey, where any drug has to pass important rigorous checks before approval as a medicine. This trial is an important ‘first’ in the drug development process.

Read More »

Tissue biomarkers: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Around the globe, teams are working to find tissue biomarkers for MND and there some promising candidates coming through, some of which were explored at session 8C of the Symposium: Tissue Biomarkers.

We first heard from Rebekah Ahmed (C83), who presented her data on possible neuroendocrine and metabolic biomarkers. Ahmed and her team analysed several proteins related to these systems in the blood of 127 people with either MND or MND with FTD and compared them to controls. The Neuropeptide Y protein (NPY), which is related to eating habits and food intake, was found to be higher in people with MND and MND-FTD, and lower in people with FTD, shining the light on a possible biomarker. All patients also had an increase in leptin and insulin levels, highlighting the need to examine how these neuroendocrine changes affect underlying disease pathology.Read More »

Psychological and emotional wellbeing: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Written by Kaye Stevens and Rachel Boothman

At the 2018 International Symposium on MND in Glasgow, it was positive to see an increase in the number of studies about the psychological and emotional impact of MND/ALS. Read about our highlights below.

From the expected to the unexpected, such as studies which considered the effect of gut health on brain and mood.  (C2) J Cryan – As stress and other factors such as medications can affect gut bacteria, there is a need to maintain a healthy microbiome. This led to a recommendation for sharing refined human poo. Coming your way soon could be ‘Crapsules’ and supplements such as ‘Poopulate’.

(C40) Jane Parkin Kullmann – In other work on stress, researchers in Australia found that stress is not necessarily a risk factor in the development of MND/ALS, indeed it appears that people with the disease may actually be more resilient. Further study is ongoing to determine whether this might indicate a genetic difference.Read More »

Technology and MND: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Where to start on a subject as wide and varied as technology and MND?

Indeed, this problem is not just limited to a simple blog post, it is a challenge for us as an MND charity faced with a proliferation of potentially beneficial technological developments in smartphones, wheelchairs, and exoskeletons to name but a few.

Fortunately, there is a fundamental question that can help us make sense of it all and it is a question that stems from our Association values – What does this mean for people with MND? I’ll be trying to answer this question as part of my summary of technology talks from our 29th International Symposium.

Much of the content that was presented related to the use of technology in clinical trials, so let’s start by considering clinical trials and what we want from them:

  • We want them to be efficient and report results quickly – this means they will be cheaper, so we can do more of them and secure a cure or effective treatment for MND more quickly.
  • We also want the trials to be reliable and give accurate results whilst allowing as much patient participation as possible.
  • Above all, we want trials to translate into tangible change such as clinical developments that improve quality of life or the introduction of an effective treatment for MND.

Read More »

Clinical trials: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

In the Clinical trials and trial design (4B) session we heard from two speakers looking at ways to improve current design of clinical trials. In his plenary talk, Mahesh Parmar (C20) provided his perspective on the necessity of changes from his experience working on cancer trials, highlighting that any efforts to improve clinical trials should be focused on Phase 3 where the most money and time is spent. One solution that stuck with a lot of clinicians attending Prof Parmar’s talk was the design used in the STAMPEDE trial, a large clinical trial assessing effectiveness of new treatments for people affected by prostate cancer, which has been running since 2005. The innovation of this approach is the ongoing protocol that allows to test multiple treatments within the same established clinical trial, allowing new drug candidates to be tested (relatively) straight away, avoiding the creation of a brand new clinical trial. This design improves efficacy of testing new treatments, systematic approach to testing, and access to a large pool of participants who could take part in multiple treatment trials over time.

Brian Dickie, the Director of Research Development at the MND Association said: “Prof Parmar’s presentation generated a lot of interest amongst clinicians who are regularly involved in MND trials and there was a strong feeling that this is the direction that we need to be taking with MND as it could increase the efficiency and reduce the cost. That said, it will take a while to put the building blocks in place and we certainly wouldn’t want to hold up trials that are already in advances stages of planning, so I would expect to see a gradual introduction of changes to trials design over the coming years.”

You can learn more about the multi-arm multi-stage trial design from Prof Parmar here.

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Lifestyle & environment: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

In the Epidemiology session (5C), several talks focused on the risk associated with various lifetime events, and the demographics of people who develop MND categorised by onset at various body regions. Susan Peters (C37) and her colleagues studied a group of 1,500 people with MND and 3,000 control participants, and found that people who had suffered head trauma after the age of 55 had an increased risk of developing the disease compared to those without this type trauma. They further found reduced risk in people currently/recently taking antihypertensive and cholesterol-lowering medication, but this risk was significantly increased in people who were taking these medications earlier in life. These findings now need to be explored further to investigate the underlying mechanisms that would explain these differences.Read More »

The effects of ashwagandha in a SOD1 mouse model of MND

The research team frequently gets asked about the effectiveness of alternative therapies and their use as treatments for MND. Here we report on a recent paper that looked at the effects of ashwagandha, or Indian ginseng, in a SOD1 mouse model of MND.

For around 3000 years Withania somnifera (WS), commonly known as ashwagandha or Indian ginseng, has been used in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine around the world, and is thought to have powerful rejuvenating and life-prolonging qualities. But there is increasing evidence which suggests that the plant extracts (root, leaf or fruit) also have neuroprotective properties, and this has been demonstrated in several models of neurodegenerative diseases including MND.Read More »