What’s the story with CuATSM

There has recently been a flood of news stories on the outcomes of the Australian Phase 1 clinical trial investigating Copper ATSM (CuATSM) which is a small man-made compound that can selectively deliver copper to cells. The results were first presented at our International Symposium in Glasgow back in December.

MND is a terrible disease and anyone affected by it is looking for good news. We really hope that CuATSM will provide a new treatment for MND that is going to have a positive effect on people’s disease progression.

However, CuATSM is not yet at a stage where a clinician can prescribe it as a treatment. Drug development is a long journey, where any drug has to pass important rigorous checks before approval as a medicine. This trial is an important ‘first’ in the drug development process.

Read More »

Clinical trials: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

In the Clinical trials and trial design (4B) session we heard from two speakers looking at ways to improve current design of clinical trials. In his plenary talk, Mahesh Parmar (C20) provided his perspective on the necessity of changes from his experience working on cancer trials, highlighting that any efforts to improve clinical trials should be focused on Phase 3 where the most money and time is spent. One solution that stuck with a lot of clinicians attending Prof Parmar’s talk was the design used in the STAMPEDE trial, a large clinical trial assessing effectiveness of new treatments for people affected by prostate cancer, which has been running since 2005. The innovation of this approach is the ongoing protocol that allows to test multiple treatments within the same established clinical trial, allowing new drug candidates to be tested (relatively) straight away, avoiding the creation of a brand new clinical trial. This design improves efficacy of testing new treatments, systematic approach to testing, and access to a large pool of participants who could take part in multiple treatment trials over time.

Brian Dickie, the Director of Research Development at the MND Association said: “Prof Parmar’s presentation generated a lot of interest amongst clinicians who are regularly involved in MND trials and there was a strong feeling that this is the direction that we need to be taking with MND as it could increase the efficiency and reduce the cost. That said, it will take a while to put the building blocks in place and we certainly wouldn’t want to hold up trials that are already in advances stages of planning, so I would expect to see a gradual introduction of changes to trials design over the coming years.”

You can learn more about the multi-arm multi-stage trial design from Prof Parmar here.

Read More »

The effects of ashwagandha in a SOD1 mouse model of MND

The research team frequently gets asked about the effectiveness of alternative therapies and their use as treatments for MND. Here we report on a recent paper that looked at the effects of ashwagandha, or Indian ginseng, in a SOD1 mouse model of MND.

For around 3000 years Withania somnifera (WS), commonly known as ashwagandha or Indian ginseng, has been used in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine around the world, and is thought to have powerful rejuvenating and life-prolonging qualities. But there is increasing evidence which suggests that the plant extracts (root, leaf or fruit) also have neuroprotective properties, and this has been demonstrated in several models of neurodegenerative diseases including MND.Read More »

MND research around the world

worldmap annotated and marked

In the last decade, the MND Association has invested millions in research within the UK and across the world. We are a leader in the funding and promotion of cutting-edge MND research and, with over 30 years experience of identifying the most promising projects, we only fund and support scientific and medical research of the highest quality and relevance to MND.

And the great news is, we are not the only ones!

alliance_logo_landscape_rightThe International Alliance of ALS/MND Associations has 54 member institutions, in 40 countries around the world – from Mongolia to Mexico, Malta to Malaysia – who are supporting, funding, collaborating in and carrying out MND research, and/or offering much needed care and support to people with MND and their families.

All the institutions listed by the Alliance are shown on the map above. If you want to take a look at some of these, they are easy to access through the International Alliance website. Some of the websites are not in English but you can use the Google Translate Web tool to translate the entire site into English (or any other language).

So let’s take a whistle-stop tour and explore some of the latest research and support projects that other institutions around the world are involved in. The institutions I mention are shown on the map with a yellow pointer.Read More »

Tirasemtiv not found effective for treatment of MND

In their official press release published on 21 November 2017, Cytokinetics Inc. announced that they will not be continuing work on tirasemtiv after disappointing results in the latest Phase 3 clinical trial. The trial, known under the acronym ‘VITALITY-ALS’, tested whether the drug has a beneficial effect on the breathing function and muscle strength of people with MND. This is very unfortunate news for everyone affected by the disease, however, Cytokinetics are already testing another compound with the hope that this will be more effective and better tolerated than tirasemtiv.

Tirasemtiv is a drug that aims to improve quality of life of people living with MND by increasing strength of their skeletal muscles (controlling body motion and posture) and therefore postponing muscle fatigue. It compensates for the missing nerve signal from a motor neurone to a muscle that instructs it to contract. Tirasemtiv activates a protein called troponin by increasing its sensitivity to calcium, which is crucial for muscle contraction.Read More »

Lithium revisited: Is there a baby in the bathwater?

At last year’s Airlie House workshop to develop new ALS/MND Clinical Trial Guidelines the focus was, of course, on MND, but there was also important input and learning from outside the field.

One of the most fascinating presentations was from an oncologist who was explaining how detailed genetic analysis of tumours was leading to an understanding of why some experimental cancer drugs appeared to only work in a small subgroup of patients. The take home message from the cancer field was that there should be more effort made in future MND trials to identify and analyse smaller subgroups of patients, in case a potentially positive effect might be missed.

A new research paper, published in the journal Neurology, raises some intriguing findings from the trials of the drug lithium that were carried out several years ago. Lithium generated a lot of excitement when researchers in Italy reported a positive effect of the drug in the SOD1 mouse model of MND. Almost as an afterthought, their research paper mentioned that they had tested the drug in a small short-term trial in patients and it appeared to have some effect.Read More »

Lighthouse Project shines a beacon on HERVs and their role in ALS

There is recent evidence to suggest that Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) may be involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). HERV-K has been directly linked to motor neurone damage and has been found in the brain tissue of patients with ALS.

The MND Association recently awarded a small grant to fund part of the ‘Lighthouse Project’ which is investigating the safety and any beneficial effects of an antiretroviral drug on ALS symptoms.Read More »

Edaravone – a month on since the FDA announcement

It’s been over a month since the announcement by the FDA of their decision to licence edaravone / Radicava for people with MND in the USA. The speed of the FDA’s decision took the drug company MT Pharma and the MND research community by suprise. It is encouraging that edaravone has been licenced to treat MND after two decades of failed drug trials. Since the FDA announcement the effects of the drug and what it means for people with MND has been extensively discussed and some of the trial data has been published.

This blog is an update on what studies have been done on edaravone and the likelihood of people with MND noticing a beneficial effect if they were to receive it.Read More »

The journey of a drug – what it takes to be approved

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs.

So far, there is no cure for MND. In the past 22 years, we have only seen approval of two drugs that were either shown to prolong the life of MND patients by several months (riluzole in 1995 in the US) or to slow down symptom progression (edaravone in 2015 in Japan). It is only reasonable that you might wonder ‘what is taking so long?’ or ‘why are there not more drugs available?’.

It is very competitive in the world of medicinal drugs. From thousands of chemical compounds that are gradually eliminated as they go through different stages of drug development, only one makes it near the finish line. This line represents approval for marketing authorisation and there is no guarantee that this ‘top compound’ will actually make it to the end. So let’s have a closer look at the individual stages that a potential drug has to go through in order to be crowned the champion.Read More »

Edaravone (Radicava) approved to treat MND in USA – what does this mean for people with MND in the UK

On Friday 5 May in America, the FDA, the organisation that approves drugs, announced that they’d granted a licence for the drug known as a Edaravone (to be marketed as Radicava ) for the treatment of MND. It’s unexpected news and we’re currently working out what this means for people with MND in the UK. Below is more information on what we know so far:

Read More »