The effects of ashwagandha in a SOD1 mouse model of MND

The research team frequently gets asked about the effectiveness of alternative therapies and their use as treatments for MND. Here we report on a recent paper that looked at the effects of ashwagandha, or Indian ginseng, in a SOD1 mouse model of MND.

For around 3000 years Withania somnifera (WS), commonly known as ashwagandha or Indian ginseng, has been used in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine around the world, and is thought to have powerful rejuvenating and life-prolonging qualities. But there is increasing evidence which suggests that the plant extracts (root, leaf or fruit) also have neuroprotective properties, and this has been demonstrated in several models of neurodegenerative diseases including MND.Read More »

MND and the mind – who is affected?

Motor Neurone Disease (MND), as the name suggests, is known as a disease of motor neurons, a specific type of neurons that co-ordinate our voluntary movement, leading to loss of the ability to move, speak and breathe. And perhaps because the main focus often falls on the rapidly-progressing physical symptoms and their management, the way MND affects the mind has often be overlooked.

brain networkMost literature on MND states that certain behavioural and cognitive (thinking) problems affect up to 50% people with MND, out of which 15% have a co-occurring diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Adding to this, a recent paper by Dr Christopher Crockford and colleagues, published in the journal Neurology, found that up to 80% of people living with MND will have some form of cognitive or behavioural impairment by the final stage of their disease (or in other words, only 20% will have an intact cognitive and behavioural processing).Read More »

MND research around the world

worldmap annotated and marked

In the last decade, the MND Association has invested millions in research within the UK and across the world. We are a leader in the funding and promotion of cutting-edge MND research and, with over 30 years experience of identifying the most promising projects, we only fund and support scientific and medical research of the highest quality and relevance to MND.

And the great news is, we are not the only ones!

alliance_logo_landscape_rightThe International Alliance of ALS/MND Associations has 54 member institutions, in 40 countries around the world – from Mongolia to Mexico, Malta to Malaysia – who are supporting, funding, collaborating in and carrying out MND research, and/or offering much needed care and support to people with MND and their families.

All the institutions listed by the Alliance are shown on the map above. If you want to take a look at some of these, they are easy to access through the International Alliance website. Some of the websites are not in English but you can use the Google Translate Web tool to translate the entire site into English (or any other language).

So let’s take a whistle-stop tour and explore some of the latest research and support projects that other institutions around the world are involved in. The institutions I mention are shown on the map with a yellow pointer.Read More »

Why do we need the MND Register?

Whilst we believe that there are currently around 5,000 adults in the UK living with MND at any one time, the precise figure is not known as there is no single source of information to confirm it. The MND Register of England, Wales and Northern Ireland is set to find a more accurate figure of the true number of people living with the disease. This research study, funded by the MND Association with the support of the Betty Messenger Foundation and an anonymous family trust, is jointly led by Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi at King’s College London and Professor Kevin Talbot at the University of Oxford.

Despite our increasing knowledge of the role that genetics plays in MND, there is strong evidence to suggest that MND is a complex disease that is triggered by a combination of genetic predisposition to the disease and exposure to external environmental influences such as occupational and lifestyle factors.Read More »

Steps to understanding MND

Love them or loath them, the band Steps’ first single ‘5,6,7,8’ was a techno line dance song released in 1998 from their debut album ‘step one’, with the B side ‘words of wisdom’.

Using this forced and purely tenuous link and an equally awkward segue, I would like to share with you the news that the journal Neurology this week published further words of wisdom from Professor Adriano Chio, Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi and colleagues, that revisits the multistep hypothesis of MND. Their previous work showed that when no genetic cause is considered, developing MND is a six-step process. In their most recent work, the team investigated how many of the steps does a genetic mutation account for in this multistep process, with a focus on the most common MND causative genes SOD1, TARDBP, and C9ORF72.Read More »

AMBRoSIA and NECTAR – Make your mark on MND

It has been almost a year since we announced that AMBRoSIA (A Multicentre Biomarker Resource Strategy In ALS) had begun to recruit participants (read the Autumn 2017 edition of Thumbprint).

AMBRoSIA is the biggest project that the MND Association has ever funded and recruitment occurs at three sites throughout the UK (Sheffield, headed by Prof Dame Pam Shaw, Oxford, headed by Prof Martin Turner and London, headed by Dr Andrea Malaspina).

The project will collect a number of biological samples, including blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), urine and skin in order to identify biomarkers (markers of biological change) that could be a signature of MND.Read More »

What’s going on inside? Possible mechanisms associated with physical activity and MND

Physical activity and MND – part 3

This is the final blog article in our trio of blogs that are looking at physical activity and MND. The first two have addressed the questions ‘did the amount of physical activity I undertook before my diagnosis cause my MND?’ and ‘can I continue with physical activity after my diagnosis, or will this make my MND worse?’

Despite the evidence reported by Visser and colleagues, which showed an increase of 6% in the risk of developing MND in people with high activity levels (discussed in the first of these blogs), there is limited evidence to support a relationship between physical activity and the development of MND, that is, what exactly is it about physical activity that would lead to MND-specific neurodegeneration. The available evidence tends to suggest it is more likely that there are other, as yet unidentified, factors associated with physical activity that might drive the risk. However, several credible explanations for how exercise could directly cause MND have been proposed and studied and we are going to take a more in-depth look at some of these here.Read More »

Exercise after diagnosis – a closer look at the evidence

Physical activity and MND – part 2

This is part two of our series of blogs looking at links between physical activity and MND. This article will look at whether or not exercise should be continued after diagnosis.

Exercise is widely recommended to the general population due to its benefits to health and wellbeing. It improves the cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal, and endocrine functions and leads to psychological wellbeing. Many people with MND specifically ask whether they can safely continue to exercise regularly without fear of accelerating their disease. At present, there is no firm evidence that exercise exerts a harmful effect, although avoidance of very strenuous activity would seem to be sensible. Low-grade, managed, exercise programmes may even be of benefit.Read More »

Does physical activity cause MND? A fresh look at the evidence

Physical activity and MND – part 1

Every month the Research Information team looks at ‘the stats’ for the MND Research blog. These show us how many times each of our blogs are looked at and, every month, ‘Physical activity and MND – is there a link?’ features in the top five. This is possibly driven by media stories of professional sportspeople who have been diagnosed with MND. As we receive a lot of emails about this subject, we felt it was about time for an update as ‘the stats’ suggest this is a topic close to people’s hearts.

This is the first of three blog articles looking at MND and physical activity and other factors that may, or may not, play a role in the development of the disease.

Read More »

Collaboration and Consortium Cracking the Code: Uncovering KIF5A – MND gene

DNA magnification glass pitchfork3‘Big data’ projects require detailed analysis of unimaginably large volumes of complex data. This is especially true in the realm of MND gene discovery when searching for MND-associated genes – where the greater the number of samples analysed, the greater the possibility of finding the relatively less frequently occurring genetic causes (known as ‘rare’ variants). Literally a needle in a haystack.

These discoveries are no less important, as each new discovery is highly significant and provides another piece of the puzzle in our understanding of the causes and avenues to target for potential treatments. A clear example of this is collecting and mining the data from tens of thousands of human ‘genomes’ to identify the genes responsible for MND. By working together, researchers can greatly increase their ability to tease out the difficult to find discoveries.Read More »