Psychological and emotional wellbeing: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Written by Kaye Stevens and Rachel Boothman

At the 2018 International Symposium on MND in Glasgow, it was positive to see an increase in the number of studies about the psychological and emotional impact of MND/ALS. Read about our highlights below.

From the expected to the unexpected, such as studies which considered the effect of gut health on brain and mood.  (C2) J Cryan – As stress and other factors such as medications can affect gut bacteria, there is a need to maintain a healthy microbiome. This led to a recommendation for sharing refined human poo. Coming your way soon could be ‘Crapsules’ and supplements such as ‘Poopulate’.

(C40) Jane Parkin Kullmann – In other work on stress, researchers in Australia found that stress is not necessarily a risk factor in the development of MND/ALS, indeed it appears that people with the disease may actually be more resilient. Further study is ongoing to determine whether this might indicate a genetic difference.Read More »

Commitment to COMMENDable research

Whilst the vast majority of MND research happens in the lab, there is also an increasing amount of research activity looking into how best to manage the various symptoms of the disease.  There are a lot of unanswered questions as to ‘What Works and What Doesn’t?’ and without a decent level of evidence, it is increasingly difficult in these cash-strapped days to get new or even existing types of therapy adopted into mainstream statutory care.

One such ‘Cinderella’ subject is psychological support for people with MND. It’s hardly surprising that studies show almost half of people diagnosed with MND experience depression and almost a third experience anxiety, yet there is very little guidance on how to best address these symptoms. As a result, formal psychological support is not routinely offered and where it is, the particular approach taken is based on best judgement rather than robust evidence.Read More »