Is frontotemporal dementia different when found with MND?

Some people with MND develop an increasingly recognised form of dementia, known as frontotemporal dementia  or FTD (for more information visit http://www.ftdtalk.org/). The main symptoms of FTD include alterations in decision making, behaviour and difficulty with language.

The relationship between MND and FTD is not well understood. Prof Julie Snowden and PhD student Jennie Saxon at the Cerebral Function Unit in Salford (University of Manchester) are aiming to establish whether MND combined with FTD is subtly different to when FTD is found on its own (our grant reference: 872-792).

People diagnosed with FTD-MND, with FTD alone, and those with no form of dementia will perform a series of short cognitive tasks. These will test things including a person’s ability to recognise emotions, draw inferences about the thoughts of others, their ability to concentrate, organise actions and understand language.Read More »

Are there differences between FTD alone and FTD-MND?

The last of our FTD awareness week blog posts is focussing on a healthcare project looking into FTD (frontotemporal dementia) and FTD-MND (FTD when combined with MND). The project began last year and is being part-funded by us.

Jennie Adams
Jennie Adams

Professor Julie Snowden and PhD student Jennie Adams at the Cerebral Function Unit in Salford (University of Manchester) are looking into the behavioural and cognitive aspects of FTD and FTD-MND.

They are aiming to work out if there are any differences in thinking or behaviour between people who have MND-FTD and those who have FTD on its own.

For example this could be looking to see if people with FTD-MND tend to show more difficulties with language, but not have many changes relating to behaviour. Or if people with ‘pure’ FTD show more difficulties with appropriate behaviour in public, compared to organisation and planning skills.Read More »

Is MND/FTD the same as FTD alone?

brain Association-funded researcher, Prof Julie Snowden from the University of Manchester was invited to present her research on MND and frontotemporal dementia at this year’s 25th International Symposium on ALS/MND. She is asking whether people living with MND and frontotemporal dementia develop a different form of dementia that is different to those with frontotemporal dementia alone.

In 2011, when researchers discovered the C9orf72 inherited-MND gene, it was also linked to the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia (find out more about inherited MND here). This increasingly recognised form of dementia has different signs and symptoms to the more common Alzheimer’s disease, but is less understood.

Researchers are now studying these previously separate diseases together. By working collaboratively with dementia researchers, we are beginning to understand this gene and the link between the two diseases. But what precisely is this link? In the past there were distinct disorders? Prof Snowden answered these questions as thinking of MND and FTD as a spectrum. Read More »