Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi wins prestigious prize

Huge congratulations to Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi for winning the prestigious Sheila Essey Award at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) research conference taking place in Vancouver, Canada.

Professor Al-Chalabi is an MND Association funded researcher and Professor of Neurology and Complex Disease Genetics at King’s College London. He is also the Director of our MND Care and Research Centre at King’s.

The Sheila Essey Award is jointly given by the AAN and the ALS Association in the USA, and recognises an individual who has made significant research contributions in the search for the cause, prevention of, and cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a type of MND).

Prof Al-Chalabi is receiving the award for his role in helping us learn more about the complex causes of MND, including the role of genetics in the non-familial form of MND.

“It is a wonderful acknowledgement of the work the present and past members of my team have done in ALS/MND research,” Prof Al-Chalabi said.Read More »

Looking for MND genes: Project MinE update

Project MinE is an international genetics project that is analysing DNA from people with MND in detail.

For the majority of people with MND, the disease appears ‘sporadically’ for no apparent reason. For a small number of people, approximately 5-10% of those with MND there is an inherited link, in other words the disease runs in their families.

We know a lot about the genes that are damaged in the rare inherited forms of MND. We also know that very subtle genetic factors, together with environmental and lifestyle factors contribute to why the majority of people develop the disease. These subtle genetic factors are very hard to find.

The goal of Project MinE is to find the other genes that cause inherited MND and help us find out more about these subtle genetic risk factors.

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Project MinE was born when Dutch entrepreneur Bernard Muller challenged his neurologist to do something with all the DNA samples in his freezer – samples being stored there for future analysis. ‘Why can’t those samples be analysed now?’ was his question. That was two years ago!Read More »

On the seventh day of Christmas MND research gave to me: Seven research strategy themes

“On the seventh day of Christmas MND research gives to you… our SEVEN research strategy themes”

It’s New Year’s eve, a time to look back and celebrate on 2014 and our MND research achievements. It’s also a time to look to the future; in 2015 we will be funding new MND research in line with our research strategy.

Our 2010-2015 research strategy focuses on seven key themes.

causes1) Identifying the causes of MND

The exact cause of the majority of cases of MND is still unknown. Therefore identifying the causes is our first step in understanding MND and developing future treatments.

In 2014 we identified two new inherited MND genes and also announced funding for the UK Whole Genome Sequencing project to better identify the rarer genetic factors involved in causing the disease. Read more.

models2) Create and validate new models

Once we identify a genetic cause of MND, we need to find out how this gene causes MND. Animal and cellular models help us to find out how the gene affects the motor neurones and how this causes disease in a complex animal system. Read More »

Very ‘ice’ research

The ALS #icebucketchallenge, which started in America, has now well and truly hit the UK! The social media craze has seen thousands of people getting involved in raising awareness of ‘ALS’( the most common form of MND), and funds for the Association, by placing a bucket of ice-cold water over their heads. But what happens to the donations?

The #icebucketchallenge has raised awareness of MND and has got people asking ‘what is ALS/MND?’ The donations raised will enable us to support people with MND and fund vital research. We thought we would share with you some of our ‘coolest’ research this bank holiday weekend, which the #icebucketchallenge is helping to fund:

The UK MND DNA bank (link to previous blog) freezers store DNA at a rather chilly -80°C! Now, that’s a lot colder than any #icebucketchallenge (image courtesy of CIGMR Biobank)
The UK MND DNA bank freezers store DNA at a rather chilly -80°C! Now, that’s a lot colder than any #icebucketchallenge (image courtesy of CIGMR Biobank)

Read More »

Project-MinE

Barbara Thuss is project co-ordinator for Project MinE, an international initiative with the aim of sequencing at least 15,000 MND genomes. We announced earlier today that the MND Association is funding the UK-arm of this initiative, known as the Whole Genome Sequencing project. Here Barbara explains more about Project-MinE.

Although the precise cause of MND is still unknown, in recent years it has become increasingly clear that this devastating and fatal disease of the motor neurons has a genetic basis. Project-MinE is an ambitious international research initiative aimed at detecting genetic causes and risk factors for MND. The project has been initiated by two people living with MND, along with the ALS research group in the Netherlands.

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The UK Whole Genome Sequencing project

Dr Samantha Price is the Research Information Co-ordinator at the MND Association. As well as organising the ‘blog a day’ during MND Awareness Month she also communicates the latest news about MND research. Here she blogs about the MND Association’s announcement of the UK Whole Genome Sequencing project.

It’s been a brilliant Awareness Month with blogs about zebrafish research and streaking meerkats. To end on a positive research note, we’re delighted to announce that we are funding a UK Whole Genome Sequencing project to help us understand more about the causes of MND. Utilising samples from our own UK MND DNA bank; researchers in the UK will aim to sequence 1,500 genomes to help identify more of the genetic factors involved in the disease.  Read More »