Postcard from Australia

Emma Devenney at this year's symposium in Milan
Emma Devenney at last year’s symposium in Milan

Dr Emma Devenney is an MND Association and Neuroscience Research Australia funded PhD student investigating the Cerebellum in MND and Frontotemporal Dementia at Neuroscience Research Australia. She is finding out what role it plays in the symptoms of patients with the C9orf72 mutation. Here she blogs about her work from Australia!

Finally after more than 12 months of preparation and anticipation I touched down in Sydney to be greeted by a city in the throes of early summer. Sydney in the summer is the epitome of the Australian dream and it is easy to see how it has enticed many Irish and British immigrants to its shores. The blue skies, beautiful beaches and a lively cultural and social scene are amongst many of the cities attractions and distractions.

Neuroscience Research Australia is in the exuberant Eastern suburbs of Sydney; an area where the British and Irish expatriate communities have integrated well into Australian society and are as reliant on a daily ‘flat white’ as any self-respecting Australian. The research centre is located down the hill from the Prince of Wales hospital in the suburb of Randwick. Read More »

Neuroimaging – can we see more clearly?

Plenary speaker Dr Massimo Filippi put this question to delegates on the second day of the 24th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Opening the session on neuroimaging, Dr Filippi gave an excellent review on what we currently know about this area of research, and ultimately answering whether or not we can see more clearly in MND?

Neuroimaging - now and then.
Neuroimaging – now and then.

It’s all in your head – Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Over the past ten years there have been significant advances in the identification of neuroimaging patterns in MND. Dr Filippi focused mainly on the use of MRI neuroimaging (a technique used to visualise changes in the brain). He stated: “Through the use of MRI we have been able to detect cortical thickness of the Cerebral cortex (the outermost layer of the brain), which is significantly reduced in MND”.

Read More »