Microbiome: is the answer in our guts?

Exploring the link between our guts and our general health is becoming increasingly popular. Studies of people with various physical and mental health conditions suggest there may be an important link that has not yet been explored in MND.

Researchers are now looking closely into the association between our gut microbiome and our vulnerability to develop a range of psychological and neurological conditions, ranging from autism,  depression, schizophrenia, to multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and MND.

Now more than ever, research into finding out more about the impact of our microbiome on our mental and physical wellbeing is being carried out, with more than 80% of all scientific publications on gut microbiome being published after 2013. This surge of interest in the topic is quite optimistic and has the potential to  repair any functions affected by the ill-effects of gut imbalance.Read More »

Psychological and emotional wellbeing: Highlights from Glasgow

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Written by Kaye Stevens and Rachel Boothman

At the 2018 International Symposium on MND in Glasgow, it was positive to see an increase in the number of studies about the psychological and emotional impact of MND/ALS. Read about our highlights below.

From the expected to the unexpected, such as studies which considered the effect of gut health on brain and mood.  (C2) J Cryan – As stress and other factors such as medications can affect gut bacteria, there is a need to maintain a healthy microbiome. This led to a recommendation for sharing refined human poo. Coming your way soon could be ‘Crapsules’ and supplements such as ‘Poopulate’.

(C40) Jane Parkin Kullmann – In other work on stress, researchers in Australia found that stress is not necessarily a risk factor in the development of MND/ALS, indeed it appears that people with the disease may actually be more resilient. Further study is ongoing to determine whether this might indicate a genetic difference.Read More »

Funding for Gut-sy MND research announced

Yesterday the Reta Lila Weston Trust announced that they will be funding Dr Nikhil Sharma and colleagues at the Leonard Wolfson Experimental Neurology Centre (LWENC) to investigate whether the bacteria that live in our guts could alter the progression of MND. The grant is for £1.2 million over a period of four years. The LWENC is run jointly by the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery (NHNN) and University College London (UCL).

Incredibly, researchers have found a link between the bacteria that live in our guts and important cells called microglia. We know that microglia help regulate the function of the motor neurones. This study aims to find out whether the balance of gut bacteria in MND could be linked to changes in microglia.Read More »