Mice and Marbles: A CRISPR Model of Motor Neurone Disease

In a study published in Nature Neuroscience this week, a collaboration led by Dr. Jemeen Sreedharan and colleagues from King’s College London, the Babraham Institute and the University of Cambridge have published a new mouse model of Motor Neurone Disease (MND).

The study takes advantage of cutting edge gene editing technology called CRISPR/CAS9 to generate a mouse model of the human disease that accurately mimics a genetic component found in some people affected by MND. The researchers used the gene editing technology to precisely change (mutate) the gene that the body uses to produce the protein TDP-43, a very important player in the MND story implicated in almost all cases of MND.Read More »

Catch up on Symposium…focus on ‘clinical management’

From abstracts to posters, pushpins to ribbons, it takes a whole year to get to this day – no, not Christmas, but the 28th International Symposium on ALS/MND. In this and the following ‘catch-up’ blog we will summarise what went on at the Symposium and where you can find out more information. To begin with, you can read about what goes into organising the biggest meeting of its kind on our blog:  It’s that time of year again … #alssymp.

Because of the diversity of the talks presented at the Symposium, we categorised them into five key themes that follow the timeline ‘from bench to bedside’; biomedical research, diagnosis and prognosis, causes of MND, clinical trials and treatments, and improving wellbeing and quality of life. You can read more about each of these themes on our Symposium LIVE webpages.Read More »

‘There is an app for that’ – the wonders of technology in ALS

At the end of a very busy Day 2 of the Symposium, I sat down with my colleagues for a quick chat. After a while, one of them, who has been with the Association since 1995 told us how someone once asked him: ‘So if you look at the last 20 years, how has the world progressed to know more about MND, since there is still no cure to halt it?’. ‘Technology!’, he replied without hesitation. (Alright, he is a tech guy by occupation, so his opinion might be a bit biased, but he still proves the point I am trying to make).

Technology in the world of research has progressed incredibly far. From the ability to sequence the whole genome of a person in a fraction of the time (and price) that we were able to do a decade ago, to using delicate electrodes and sensors to explore what is happening inside our bodies.Read More »