Is frontotemporal dementia different when found with MND?

Some people with MND develop an increasingly recognised form of dementia, known as frontotemporal dementia  or FTD (for more information visit http://www.ftdtalk.org/). The main symptoms of FTD include alterations in decision making, behaviour and difficulty with language.

The relationship between MND and FTD is not well understood. Prof Julie Snowden and PhD student Jennie Saxon at the Cerebral Function Unit in Salford (University of Manchester) are aiming to establish whether MND combined with FTD is subtly different to when FTD is found on its own (our grant reference: 872-792).

People diagnosed with FTD-MND, with FTD alone, and those with no form of dementia will perform a series of short cognitive tasks. These will test things including a person’s ability to recognise emotions, draw inferences about the thoughts of others, their ability to concentrate, organise actions and understand language.Read More »

Spreading the seeds of an idea: MND disease pathology

With motor neurone disease (MND), the muscle weakness almost always starts in a single part of the body, with the weakness then spreading to other muscles in an orderly fashion. Neurologists are usually quite good at predicting which muscles will be affected next, slightly less so at predicting when this will happen.

The physical changes on the outside will be reflecting events occurring in the ‘closed box’ that is the brain and spinal cord. The latest imaging techniques are starting to give us more of a picture of what’s happening in the central nervous system as the disease progresses, but further technological advances will still need to be made. The clearest picture still comes from the study of generously donated and incredibly valuable post-mortem tissue.

The second day of the Symposium saw researchers present in the Clinical-Pathological Correlates of Disease Progression session, focussing on how to understand disease progression, the role of prions in neurodegenerative diseases and the relationship between MND and frontotemporal dementia.Read More »