Could a Diabetes drug be useful in treating MND?

Today we announce a new collaboration for a preclinical research study on the diabetes drug liraglutide, in the hope that positive results will lead to a clinical trial in MND. Here’s a little more about the rationale behind the study.

The idea that drugs licensed for one disease may have some use in another completely different disease is not new, but it has gained much more attention in recent years. Researchers are developing a new understanding of disease processes, leading to new ‘drug repurposing’ opportunities, with the additional potential to reduce the time and cost of drug development.

Significant advances in genetics and molecular biology in recent years have greatly increased our understanding of the pivotal, carefully balanced cellular processes that usually keep motor neurons healthy but, when disrupted, can cause a cascade of degeneration leading ultimately to their death.Read More »

ALS/MND Clinical Trial Guidelines: your opportunity to comment!

A few months ago we wrote an article about the ALS Clinical Trials Workshop which took place in Virginia, USA. Since then the Guidelines Working Groups have been busy turning the large number of issues debated into a first draft of a new set of guidelines. This is open for comment from 1- 31 August.

The guidelines will be posted on this website, and comments can be sent to guidelines.public.comments@gmail.com.

The guidelines are divided into sections:

  • Preclinical studies
  • Study design and biological and phenotypic heterogeneity
  • Outcome measures
  • Therapeutic / Symptomatic interventions in clinical trials
  • Patient recruitment and retention
  • Biomarkers
  • Different trial phases and beyond – (there are two sections on this)

Within each of these sections, there are many recommendations. The Clinical Trials Guidelines Investigators want to ensure that all interested people and stakeholders have an opportunity to provide input – whether you are a researcher, clinician or person with MND.

Thank you very much for your help.

For more information, please see a copy of their press release below:Read More »

New genetic discoveries tell us more about what causes MND – Part 2

Two sets of MND genetic results were published yesterday. One of these results was about the importance of a new gene called NEK1. The second highlighted the role of gene C21orf2 in MND – we wrote an article about this yesterday. Both sets of results were published in the prestigious journal Nature Genetics.

What are the results and what do they tell us?

Researchers found that variations in the NEK1 gene contribute to why people develop the rare, inherited form of MND. Variations in the NEK1 gene were also found to be one of the many factors that tip the balance towards why people with no family history develop MND.

NEK1 has many jobs within motor neurones including helping keeping their shape and keeping the transport system open. Future research will tell us how we can use this new finding to target drugs to stop MND.Read More »

New genetic discoveries tell us more about what causes MND – Part 1

Today some exciting news about the genetics of MND was published in the scientific journal Nature Genetics. The results come in two research papers published in the same issue of the journal.

This blog post discusses the results of the first of these papers for which King’s College London based Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi was one of the leading researchers. A post on the second paper will follow later.

Here we’ve given an overview of what the researchers have found, what it means for people with MND and how the analysis was conducted. You can read a more detailed explanation of the research results from the King’s press release.Read More »

Working together towards a world free from MND

During MND Awareness Month we are highlighting some of the research the MND Association funds in our ‘Project a Day’ series. Today, on global ALS/MND awareness day, we wanted to give you a look at the research into motor neurone disease taking place elsewhere.

Thousands of researchers across the globe are working towards a world free from MND. Rather than tell you each of their stories, we have gone to those that fund and facilitate this research, and asked them how their efforts bring us closer to figuring out the causes of MND, and finding treatments for this disease.

“I find huge inspiration in the knowledge that when I finish my work for the day, the MND researchers in Australia are just beginning theirs.” Prof Martin Turner, University of OxfordRead More »

The MND Register of England, Wales and Northern Ireland

What is the MND Register?

The MND Register is a major five year project that aims to collect and store information about every person living with MND in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. It is led by world-class MND researchers Prof Ammar Al-Chalabi and Prof Kevin Talbot, at a cost of £400,500 (our grant reference: 926-794).

Why is it important?

MND is believed to affect 5,000 people in the UK at any one time, however the true figure is not known as there is currently no way of recording this information. The register aims to provide us with the true number of people living with MND in the UK.

The information collected will answer questions about how many people have MND in different areas, how the condition progresses, and how the disease can affect people. The register will connect people with MND to researchers, including those conducting clinical trials, and will provide valuable information to guide the future development of care services.

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How will information be collected and used?

The register will be advertised nationally to all people with MND and related healthcare professionals. People with MND will be provided with detailed information about the register, and after some time for consideration, they can agree to take part. Their information will be recorded onto a secure database, either by a healthcare professional, or by the person with MND themselves through a register website (this will then be checked by a healthcare professional).Read More »

Research on the best practical support for people with cognitive change

We know that some people with MND will be affected by cognitive change and a small proportion of these will develop frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The symptoms of cognitive change include changes in planning and decision making.

To help support people with MND who have these symptoms, and their families and carers, we need to firstly identify or confirm these signs are present and then to find ways to help manage them.

The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (known as ECAS) has been widely adopted as a good method of detecting symptoms of cognitive change. ECAS is a series of tests that are quick to do in the clinic and are specific to MND.Read More »

Understanding and preventing the protein build-up that can cause nerve cells to die

Prior research has already shown that build-up of the protein TDP-43 is found in the majority of cases of MND (irrespective of whether it was caused by an inherited genetic mistake). In healthy nerve cells, TDP-43 is normally found in the cell nucleus (the management centre of the cell). But when we look at nerve cells from people with MND, we see that the TDP-43 has left the nucleus and moved to the main body of the cell and clumped together. We do not know why this happens, or how it leads to cell damage in MND.

In nerve cells, old proteins are ‘tagged’ for breaking down and disposal (or recycling). We have an idea that TDP-43 may impact on this process.

To investigate how TDP-43 causes motor neurones to die, Dr Jacqueline Mitchell and her team at King’s College, London have created several new mouse models to investigate how TDP-43 causes motor neurones to die in MND (our grant reference: 828-791).Read More »

Using fruit flies to understand a genetic cause of MND

Mistakes in a gene known as ALS5, or spatacsin, cause a rare form of inherited MND that develops at a much earlier age than most other forms of the disease. Under supervision from Dr Cahir O’Kane, MND Association funded PhD student Alex Patto has been using fruit flies to understand how mistakes in spatacsin cause MND (our grant reference 861-792).

Prior to this research, which is based at the Department of Genetics at the University of Cambridge, nothing was known about how faulty spatacsin leads to motor neurone degeneration. Three and a half year years on, this research has shed light on this important question.

What did they find?

By conducting tests in the fruit flies, Alex has found that the spatacsin protein has a role in cell recycling (also known as autophagy), a process which keeps cells healthy. When the spatacsin protein is faulty it leads to disrupted cell recycling and abnormal levels of another protein called Rab7, which might contribute to MND development.Read More »

30 chapters of MND research

During MND Awareness Month (1-30 June), we will be publishing a new post each day. Our ‘Project a Day’ series will celebrate the whole range of areas in which the MND Association funds research.

Thanks to the generous donations of our supporters, we currently fund over 80 research projects, across five themes:

  • Causes: These projects aim to understand what causes the motor neurones to die. This is essential to allow the development of treatments.
  • Models of MND: One way in which to understand the function of a gene and how this goes wrong in disease is to use a model. These projects aim to develop new and better models of MND to understand the causes of MND.
  • Healthcare: These projects aim to increase the quality of life of people living with MND, as well as improving care. These projects have a direct impact on people living with MND here and now.
  • Markers of disease progression: There is currently no diagnostic test for MND and no specific ‘biomarker’ to monitor the disease. These projects aim to find a marker of disease progression to speed up diagnosis, prognosis and disease monitoring of MND.
  • Developing treatments: These projects aim to test the effectiveness of potential treatments, from laboratory stage to the clinical trial environment.

Read More »