How is tissue donation helping us to solve the MND puzzle?

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs.

Last year, I wrote about our trip to a brain bank. Here, we learned about how people can arrange to donate their tissue (brain and spinal cord) to tissue banks after they die, and how it is stored and used in MND research all around the UK.

What you might be asking is: what can tissue actually tell us about MND, and how will this help us find new treatments?

To find new drugs that can beat this disease we first need to understand what is going on in the brain, which is very difficult to study in living people. This is why post-mortem tissue from people with MND is an invaluable resource. Below are four reasons why tissue donation is so important.Read More »

Our Visit to a Brain Bank

Brain banks are a vital resource in MND research. The MRC London Neurodegenerative Diseases Brain Bank was established in 1989. It is part of King’s College London and King’s College Hospital, and is part-funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC).

The new brain bank building at King's
The new brain bank building at King’s

After 18 months of planning, the bank has recently relocated into a bright terracotta building, fit with state-of-the-art equipment and plenty of space to teach in.

To celebrate the move, my research team colleague Martina and I attended their open day. We heard some interesting talks then got to meet the team, tour the labs, and even see a brain dissection! Here’s what we found out…Read More »

Using stem cell technology to understand more about how MND and FTD develop

The MND Association are funding Prof Kevin Talbot, Dr Ruxandra Dafinca (née Mutihac) and colleagues at the University of Oxford, who are investigating the link between the C9orf72 and TDP-43 genes in MND. We wrote about this research earlier in the year. As we’ve recently received their first year progress report we wanted to give you an update on what they’ve achieved.Read More »