Using stem cell technology to understand more about how MND and FTD develop

The MND Association are funding Prof Kevin Talbot, Dr Ruxandra Dafinca (née Mutihac) and colleagues at the University of Oxford, who are investigating the link between the C9orf72 and TDP-43 genes in MND. We wrote about this research earlier in the year. As we’ve recently received their first year progress report we wanted to give you an update on what they’ve achieved.Read More »

Transforming skin cells into nerve cells to understand MND gene mutations

In previous research Prof Kevin Talbot and colleagues at the University of Oxford began to understand more about how the C9orf72 gene defect causes human motor neurones to die. These studies were carried out using an impressive piece of lab technology, called induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology.

iPSC technology allows skin cells to be reprogrammed into stem cells, which are then directed to develop into motor neurones. Because they originated from people with MND, the newly created motor neurones will also be affected by the disease. Researchers can grow and study these cells in a dish in the laboratory.Read More »

A research perspective on the MND Association spring conferences

Following on from Peter Bickley, Dr Ruxandra Mutihac volunteered to present her research at the Newport Spring Conference earlier this year. Here she gives an insight in to her work at Oxford and her experience of the day.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis April, I had the privilege of giving the research talk of the day at the MND spring conference in Newport, Wales. I was delighted to be given the opportunity to share with people living with MND and their carers the research I am doing at Oxford University on stem cell derived motor neurones. During the day I was completely taken aback by everyone’s interest and enthusiasm on the subject.Read More »

Using induced pluripotent stem cells to further our understanding of MND

Dr Jakub Scaber from the University of Oxford is our newest Medical Research Council (MRC)/ MND Association Lady Edith Wolfson Clinical Research Fellow. He is investigating how the newly identified C9orf72 gene causes MND in some individuals using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology.

Courtesy of Prof Chandran's laboratory, University of Edinburgh
Courtesy of Prof Chandran’s laboratory, University of Edinburgh

Researchers funded by the Association were amongst the first to create human motor neurones from donor skin cells, mimicking the signs of MND. Today, the Association is committed to funding six research projects using iPS cell technology to further our understanding of MND. This includes the recently awarded fellowship to Dr Scaber. Read more about these projects here.

Dr Scaber will be using iPS cell technology to take skin cells from someone living with the rare inherited form of MND (5 – 10% total MND cases) caused by the C9orf72 mutation. Similar to Prof Chandran’s research at the University of Edinburgh, he will then make these cells ‘forget’ what they are and turn them into motor neurones. By studying these cells in detail he aims to find out how this mutation causes MND and whether or not gene therapy can be used as a potential treatment.

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