Work Experience with the Research Development team

Kiera portrait.JPGMy name is Kiera Belson and I have just completed three days of work experience at the Motor Neurone Disease (MND) Association for an award called the Youth STEMM Award. This consists of doing different activities and experiences linked to the different STEMM sectors: Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths and Medicine. The work I have done at the MND Association has been linked to the Science and Medicine sectors.

During the time I spent here, I have learnt things about MND as well as researching a technique called induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) technology (see below), which has been my main task over the three days. I have also learnt about the Research Development team and what they do at the Association, including management of the ‘UK MND Collections’, a resource of biological samples from people with MND, and the different categories within this: the DNA bank, the cell lines collection and the epidemiology collection.Read More »

Dr Arpan mehta

11th Lady Edith Wolfson Clinical Fellowship awarded

We are delighted to announce that Dr Arpan Mehta has been appointed as our latest Lady Edith Wolfson Fellow, jointly funded by the MND Association and Medical Research Council.  This clinical research training fellowship will help to launch his career as an aspiring academic neurologist, providing comprehensive training in cellular, molecular and bioinformatics technologies in a world-class environment.Read More »

Shining a light on our non-clinical fellow: Using blue light to control muscle movement

The MND Association is proud to support the brightest minds of MND research. Outside of general healthcare and biomedical project grants that are usually awarded to senior researchers, we also offer opportunities to young researchers – these take the form of PhD studentships and fellowships.

Fellowships are awarded to post-doctoral researchers who are able to support a research project as the leading investigator. Depending on their qualifications, the fellowship can either be clinical (for healthcare professionals) or non-clinical (for researchers with purely academic background). In the last round of non-clinical fellowship applications in October 2016, the MND Association awarded a senior fellowship to Dr Barney Bryson of University College London. In his upcoming project, due to start in August 2017, he will follow up on the findings he found together with his team, led by Prof Linda Greensmith.Read More »

Life of an MND researcher – part 2: PhD edition

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs.

In our previous article we introduced four MND researchers who gave us an insight what a typical day in the life of a researcher looks like and what carrying out a research study actually involves. In this continuation article, you will get the chance to look into the lives of four PhD students, who give us an overview of their projects and their usual daily duties.Read More »

Stem cells and MND

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs.

In this blog I’ve chosen to write about two examples of how stem cells are used in MND research – one example from a stem cell therapy clinical trial and the other example from how stem cells are used in the lab. Before explaining these in more detail, I felt it would be helpful to have a brief introduction to stem cells – and signpost you to other sources of information along the way.

Introducing stem cells
Stem cells are basic cells that have the potential to grow into any cell type – whether that’s heart cells or liver cells, muscle or motor neurones. Another way of putting it is that stem cells are cells that don’t know what they want to be when they grow up. To realise their potential and to convert themselves into other cell types, stem cells need triggers from the body – or chemicals added in the lab – that push them towards becoming more specialised cells.Read More »

Using stem cell technology to understand more about how MND and FTD develop

The MND Association are funding Prof Kevin Talbot, Dr Ruxandra Dafinca (née Mutihac) and colleagues at the University of Oxford, who are investigating the link between the C9orf72 and TDP-43 genes in MND. We wrote about this research earlier in the year. As we’ve recently received their first year progress report we wanted to give you an update on what they’ve achieved.Read More »

Stem cell trials in the news

The recent announcement about the use of stem cells to treat a form of multiple sclerosis (MS), together with early results from the BrainStorm stem cell amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) clinical trial in Israel have raised the profile of stem cells as a possible treatment for motor neurone disease.

Stem cells are unspecialised cells in the body which do not yet perform a particular function. They can renew themselves and have the ability to give rise to different types of cell, including nerve cells (motor neurones and the surrounding support cells).

Both the ALS/MND study (ALS is a type of motor neurone disease) and the MS study used stem cells found in bone marrow taken from the patient, and then given back to the same patient later on in the process. The MND study gave a new use to the bone marrow stem cells, whereas in the MS study ‘corrupt/damaged’ stem cells were replaced with a new healthier set.

Below we look at both trials in more detail and describe what they mean for people living with MND.Read More »

Human Motor Neurones

Dr Jakub Scaber is a Medical Research Council (MRC)/  MND Association Lady Edith Wolfson Clinical Research Fellow who works in Professor Kevin Talbot’s Laboratory at the Oxford University. Like Prof Chandran’s research, Dr Scaber’s fellowship is also investigating stem-cell derived motor neurones, here he blogs about his research.

jakub mn image

This is an image of motor neurons.

But not just any motor neurons – these are motor neurons that have been derived from skin cells of one of our patients who was a carrier of the most common mutation in the rare inherited form of MND (5-10% of total MND cases) – a mutation in the gene C9orf72.Read More »