New gene therapy targeting C9orf72-ALS begins Phase 1 clinical trial in the UK

This article was written by Dr Keith Mayl and Dr Ahmad Al Khleifat of King’s College London.

Researchers at King’s College Hospital, led by Professor Christopher Shaw, have embarked on the first gene therapy clinical trial for patients affected by a specific genetic form of ALS, the most common type of MND.

ALS is a progressive disease in which the nerves controlling muscle movement, known as motor neurons, degenerate resulting in muscle wasting and weakness. In about 10% of people the cause is a mutation in the C9orf72 gene. This mutation results in the formation of toxic products which are harmful to motor neurons. People with the mutation typically develop symptoms in their 50s, starting with speech and swallowing problems, followed by weakness of the arms, legs and breathing. It is also linked to problems with language and behaviour and is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia.Read More »

How animals are helping to improve our understanding of MND

‘From antibiotics and insulin to blood transfusions and treatments for cancer or HIV, virtually every medical achievement in the past century has depended directly or indirectly on research using animals’ – from the Royal Society’s position statement on the use of animals in research.

We know that talking about using animals in research is an emotive topic. We appreciate that some people will never accept that using animals in research is necessary, and we understand that it is not our place to try and influence anyone’s opinion on the use of animals in research. The purpose of this blog is to explore how using animal models of MND can further our understanding of this devastating disease, and how animals make it possible for potential new treatments for the disease to move forward into clinical trials in people.Read More »

Cognition and FTD: Highlights from Glasgow

Written by Rachel Boothman and Kaye Stevens

This blog is part of the ‘Highlights from Glasgow’ collection of articles, where you can read about the content of some of the talks and posters presented at the 29th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Exploration into cognition and frontotemporal dementia with MND/ALS continues to attract attention. At the Symposium in Glasgow 2018, we heard of several studies adding to the growing knowledge bank in this field.

A history of other mental health conditions or psychiatric disorders within the family, or for the individual, indicates a correlation with MND/FTD. There seems to be a link between this increased history and a risk of apathy. Early screening is recommended where these histories exist. This can help prepare families and enable early discussions with the person diagnosed with MND, so they can make decisions that may be important to them in the future (C41) C McHutchison.Read More »

Steps to understanding MND

Love them or loath them, the band Steps’ first single ‘5,6,7,8’ was a techno line dance song released in 1998 from their debut album ‘step one’, with the B side ‘words of wisdom’.

Using this forced and purely tenuous link and an equally awkward segue, I would like to share with you the news that the journal Neurology this week published further words of wisdom from Professor Adriano Chio, Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi and colleagues, that revisits the multistep hypothesis of MND. Their previous work showed that when no genetic cause is considered, developing MND is a six-step process. In their most recent work, the team investigated how many of the steps does a genetic mutation account for in this multistep process, with a focus on the most common MND causative genes SOD1, TARDBP, and C9ORF72.Read More »

Libraries, Doormen and Harry Potter

I usually travel to London two to three times a month for meetings and lab visits. If I’ve got any length of spare time, I head for what I call my ‘London office’ – aka the British Library. It’s close to Euston station, it’s free (!) it has a nice café for informal meetings and it has copies of all the latest textbooks and major research journals.

The way in which a cell turns its genetic instructions into the protein ‘building blocks’ it needs to function and survive is sometimes compared to a library.Read More »

Lithium revisited: Is there a baby in the bathwater?

At last year’s Airlie House workshop to develop new ALS/MND Clinical Trial Guidelines the focus was, of course, on MND, but there was also important input and learning from outside the field.

One of the most fascinating presentations was from an oncologist who was explaining how detailed genetic analysis of tumours was leading to an understanding of why some experimental cancer drugs appeared to only work in a small subgroup of patients. The take home message from the cancer field was that there should be more effort made in future MND trials to identify and analyse smaller subgroups of patients, in case a potentially positive effect might be missed.

A new research paper, published in the journal Neurology, raises some intriguing findings from the trials of the drug lithium that were carried out several years ago. Lithium generated a lot of excitement when researchers in Italy reported a positive effect of the drug in the SOD1 mouse model of MND. Almost as an afterthought, their research paper mentioned that they had tested the drug in a small short-term trial in patients and it appeared to have some effect.Read More »

Dr Arpan mehta

11th Lady Edith Wolfson Clinical Fellowship awarded

We are delighted to announce that Dr Arpan Mehta has been appointed as our latest Lady Edith Wolfson Fellow, jointly funded by the MND Association and Medical Research Council.  This clinical research training fellowship will help to launch his career as an aspiring academic neurologist, providing comprehensive training in cellular, molecular and bioinformatics technologies in a world-class environment.Read More »

Closing the door on toxic proteins – new clues in understanding a genetic form of MND

The defects in the C9orf72 gene are known to cause motor neurone disease, but researchers don’t understand why. Defective copies of this gene are passed down in some families affected by the rare, inherited form of MND. This week MND Association grantees Drs Guillaume Hautbergue, Lydia Castelli and colleagues, based at the Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience have published their research study providing some important clues about the toxicity of C9orf72. Their research is published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications.Read More »

Life of an MND researcher – part 2: PhD edition

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs.

In our previous article we introduced four MND researchers who gave us an insight what a typical day in the life of a researcher looks like and what carrying out a research study actually involves. In this continuation article, you will get the chance to look into the lives of four PhD students, who give us an overview of their projects and their usual daily duties.Read More »

Using stem cell technology to understand more about how MND and FTD develop

The MND Association are funding Prof Kevin Talbot, Dr Ruxandra Dafinca (née Mutihac) and colleagues at the University of Oxford, who are investigating the link between the C9orf72 and TDP-43 genes in MND. We wrote about this research earlier in the year. As we’ve recently received their first year progress report we wanted to give you an update on what they’ve achieved.Read More »